Experimenting Explored during Science Week at IT Sligo

Some 5,000 visitors are expected to attend the annual Science Fair at IT Sligo, which takes place on Sunday November 11, marking the beginning of Science Week 2012.

The Institute will also host nightly public lectures during the week on subjects including Amateur Rocketry, the Northern Lights, Septic Tanks and Bird Watching.

Science Week is celebrated throughout the country with the aim of promoting the relevance of science, technology, engineering and maths in our everyday lives, and to demonstrate their importance to the future development of Irish society and to the economy.

IT Sligo’s annual Science Fair is the largest free event for families in the North West and boasts an action-packed programme where discovering the science behind the magic will be a key theme for all age groups. You can make your own prehistoric necklaces, build an X-box game, or examine the chemistry behind hip hop dancing. There will be events to suit very young children as well as those with some understanding of science.

The nightly lecture series features guest lectures on the Northern Lights (Monday, November 12), an evening of Science, Poetry and the Lives of Sligo Scientists (Tuesday, November 13), “Everything you Ever Wanted to Know about a Septic Tank” (Wednesday, November 14), the Irish Amateur Rocketry Association lecture “From Donegal to Space” (Thursday, November 15) and a lecture by Bird Watch Ireland (Friday, November 16).

Dr Jeremy Bird Head of the School of Science at IT Sligo says that Science Week is an opportunity to encourage people of all ages to think about the importance of science in our everyday lives.

“The Science Fair is a great day out for families— we have found that even people who think they have no interest in science are fascinated by the experience,” he said. “Last year we had packed lecture theatres every night for the nightly public lecture series and we expect this year’s series to be just as popular. Science is all around us and we use the opportunity of Science Week every year to invite members of the public in to the Institute to learn more about how the subject applies to them and their everyday lives.”

The Science Fair takes place at IT Sligo from 12noon to 6pm on Sunday, November 11. The nightly lectures all take place at 7.30pm in IT Sligo with the exception of Tuesday Night’s event, which is being held in the Canis Major in the Clarion Hotel. Admission to all events is free and open to all members of the public to attend.

For more information see www.itsligo.ie

Science Week @ IT Sligo

Up to 5,000 visitors  attended the annual Science Fair at IT Sligo, which took place from 12noon to 6pm last Sunday November 13, marking the beginning of Science Week 2011 at the
Institute.

The largest free event for families in the North West, the Science Fair boasts an action-packed programme where discovering the science behind the magic will be a key theme for all age
groups.

Visitors to the college were treated to an atmospheric jaunt through the wonders of science and were able to learn more about everything from ancient “zombies” to the threat of climate change in today’s world.

There were events to suit very young children as well as those with some understanding of science.

“It really is an event for all the family,” stressed Ivan Sullivan a lecturer at the School of Science and organiser of the Science Fair. “In one afternoon you can build your own scientific toy and launch it, see an eagle up close, admire a fire-breathing dragon and then learn to dance, hip-hop style!” He explained that the theme of this year’s Science Week is The Chemistry of Life “and all of these activities are related to chemistry in some way”.

Science Magician  Paul McCrory was back by popular demand with his “Magic, Science or Mystery” show where water will be made to disappear, tornadoes will appear in bottles and volunteers will bravely sit on a chair of nails and learn why their backsides escape without so much as a scrape.

The nights sky is a source of fascination for people of all ages and the return of Dr Ed Barnett which his mobile planetarium promises to be a major attraction at the Science Fair.

One of the most fascinating events was presented by archaeologist and IT Sligo lecturer Chris Read, who has garnered international headlines with his account of how two skeletons buried with large stones wedged into their mouths in a historic site in Co Roscommon, suggest an ancient belief in “zombies” .

Dr Jeremy Bird head of the School of Science at IT Sligo says the Science Fair is an opportunity to encourage people of all ages to think about   the importance of chemistry in our everyday lives.

“The Science Fair is a great day out for families— we have found that even people who think they have no interest in science are fascinated by the experience”.

Nightly, free public lectures will also be hosted at IT Sligo from Monday November 14th to 18th ranging in topic from extraterrestrial life to the causes of Alzheimer’s disease, and from DNA discoveries at mass graves to the use of drugs in sport. For more information see www.itsligo.ie

 

 

 

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